White House Immigration Policy Priorities

11-27-2017

 

FRONTERA FACTS: The Local Impact and Broader Implications of the White House Immigration Policy Priorities

 

“The traditions of the oppressed teach us that the state of emergency in which we live is not the exception, but the rule.”    - Walter Benjamin (1940)

 

On October 25, 2017, Rosa Maria Hernandez (see photo[1]), a 10 year old undocumented girl of Mexican origin with cerebral palsy was intercepted by Border Patrol agents while in an ambulance on route to emergency gallbladder surgery in Corpus Christi, TX. She was placed under surveillance by immigration agents during her recovery in the hospital and then detained for 10 days at a shelter in San Antonio, resulting in the deprivation of her freedom and forcible separation from her family. Although Rosa was finally released, she and her family continue to live in great uncertainty and are vulnerable to separation and/or deportation at any time.

 

What does Rosa’s case tell us about the concrete implications of the Trump administration’s approach to immigration policy? Is her case a local aberration, or representative of more widespread tendencies in border and overall national immigration enforcement? Might cases like that of Rosa Maria Hernandez be more indicative of where the Trump administration is, and is headed, than the complicated patchwork of enforcement policies and pronouncements that has emerged from Washington, DC since the election of President Trump?

 

It is now over a month since the Trump administration issued its Immigration Policy Priorities [2], accompanied by a letter to congressional leaders highlighting its related priorities for immigration reform. These documents build on the provisions of the January 2017 Executive Orders [3] focused on immigration policy (including the various versions of a travel ban, “extreme vetting” and the targeting of sanctuary communities) as well as other actions intensifying interior enforcement. The Policy Priorities also constitute the administration’s prerequisites for any deal to extend protections in some form for Dreamers [4]. It is also one year since the 2016 presidential elections, permeated by xenophobic rhetoric regarding the supposed need for enhanced border security and a border wall. What are the implications of the administration’s principles, policies, and priorities regarding immigration issues? To what extent are these approaches reflected in practice in the intensification of national and local enforcement efforts?

 

In this edition of Frontera Facts, we will provide an introduction to these issues from the perspective of their impact on families and communities living and working in the U.S-Mexico border region, ground zero for U.S immigration policy. We will continue to explore specific dimensions of the measures proposed in the Policy Priorities issued by the White House in greater detail in future editions.

 

Our region has unique characteristics that make it especially susceptible to the prevailing rhetoric, policies and practices. But at the same time it is also important to underline that our experiences, suffering, reflection and resistance have historically and prophetically shaped broader national, regional and global trends regarding migration policy and the human rights of migrants. El Paso Bishop Mark J. Seitz’ recent pastoral letter on migration draws attention to the complex combination of burdens, responsibilities and opportunities that our region embodies in this context [5]. It has often been tempting meanwhile for legislators and operatives focused on political calibrations within the D.C Beltway to seek to trade off intensified border security measures for ostensible advances in immigration reform.

 

In many ways the Trump administration’s current approach is nothing new when assessed from the perspective of our experiences in this region. Since the early 1990’s, the intensification of enforcement along the U.S.-Mexico border has served to test, and has foreshadowed, national initiatives along the same lines. In no small way, the border’s permanent “state of emergency”, characterized by systematic and generalized human rights violations, was in effect extended to the rest of the country post-9/11. Concrete conditions along the border are both notable in terms of our local specificities and challenges, and at the same time representative of potentially broader trends. Seen from this perspective, Rosa Maria Hernandez’ unnecessary suffering is not exceptional but rather epitomizes these complexities.

 

The most recent set of administration principles and policies echoes longstanding patterns and practices in federal immigration policy since the 1990’s which prioritize “border security”, and specifically the border wall, and the extension of equivalent measures to the U.S.’ northern border. They call for a series of regressive measures which would further intensify the kinds of human rights violations characteristic of our region. Such violations have been highlighted in Bishop Seitz’ pastoral letter, in Hope Border Institute’s Discretion to Deny and its forthcoming update, and in previous editions of Frontera Facts.

 

These include proposed measures to increase the removal of migrants and asylum seekers and deter migrant flows, to expedite returns and removals (including removals of migrants from third countries, such as “partner” nations in Central and South America), to expand the criteria that render migrants inadmissible, and to discourage re-entry. They also include intensified measures of interior enforcement regarding sanctuary cities; state and local enforcement; visa overstays; proposed increased appropriations to enable the hiring of 15,000 additional enforcement agents and 300 federal prosecutors; expanding ICE’s overall detention authority through the termination of “catch-and-release laws”; increased employment verification (e.g.: expansion of “E-Verify”) and other measures to “protect” US workers, expanding the definition of “deportable aliens”; tightening visa security measures (e.g.: “extreme vetting” and now the proposed elimination of the “diversity visa” lottery program); and an overall paradigm shift from a family-based system to one that would be ostensibly more “merit-based”.    

 

In this sense the intensification of what its proponents refer to as “border security”, and the human costs this approach implies for our families and communities, has always been a pretext and scapegoat that helps anchor broader national enforcement initiatives. The administration’s approach in these principles, policies and priority initiatives must also be understood within a broader regional and global context. The overall framework of U.S. immigration policy since the implementation during the Clinton Administration in El Paso of what was initially referred to as “Operation Blockade” (and then as “Operation Hold the Line”) in September 1993, and of “Operation Gatekeeper” in San Diego in September 1994 [6], and the adoption of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Responsibility Act (IIRA) in 1996, was further reconfigured in its current direction by the imposition of the “homeland security” paradigm post-9/11.

 

All of this has been reinforced by the approach outlined by the Trump Administration in its Executive Orders and the recently issued Policy Priorities. This overall direction has been described by scholars in terms of the “securitization” [7] of migration policy (its subordination to the purported imperatives of “national security”), the “militarization of borders” [8], and the criminalization of undocumented or “irregular” migration flows and of migrants more generally [9]. Such practices necessarily result in increased deaths among migrants in transit and their increased vulnerability to trafficking [10]. These tendencies in turn are intertwined with processes and mechanisms such as the “externalization” and regionalization of borders and border controls (e.g the transfer to neighboring or “partner” states of the burdens of deterrence and enforcement, and their extension to entire regions such as the peripheries of the U.S., the E.U., and Australia) [11], and with the intensified “commodification” of migrants (the tendency to reduce migrants to their economic or productive value, both in the labor market, by governments as contributors to “development” through remittances, and by traffickers) [12.] Such tendencies have been denounced by Pope Francis as a key dimension of what he has termed the  “throw-away culture” [13], which treats human beings as if they were disposable.

 

Even as the Trump administration threatens to deepen the current precariousness of migrant rights throughout the U.S and at the border, migrant rights movements, advocates and scholars are positioning to have impact on the ongoing process within the U.N. system that is intended to culminate in Global Compacts on “safe, orderly and regular” migration and refugees which will likely be adopted at an unprecedented global summit in New York to be held in September or October 2018. The proposed compacts draw on the text of the “New York Declaration” regarding the rights of migrants and refugees adopted at the U.N. General Assembly’s “High Level Dialogue” on migration policy and migrant rights issues in September 2016 [14]. Dozens of civil society organizations from throughout the world, including the International Catholic Migration Commission, have joined together in developing an overall platform in order to influence the deliberations during the drafting process of the Global Compacts in the direction of stronger human rights protections [15]. These in effect constitute a set of alternative global principles for migrant justice that challenge the kind of approach contained in the White House Immigration Policy Priorities and reflected in cases such as that of Rosa Maria Hernandez.


Hope Border Institute together with other partners will be convening a border conference during the spring of 2018 as part of broader efforts to help position border concerns within the broader Global Compact process, and as part of the process leading up to both the U.N. summit and to the VIII World Social Forum on Migration to be held in Mexico City in November 2018. We will explore these issues in greater detail in future editions of Frontera Facts.

[1] https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/27/us/immigrant-girl-surgery-detained.html?_r=0; https://www.aclu.org/issues/release-rosa-maria-hernandez; ; https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/immigration/a-girl-with-cerebral-palsy-is-being-held-in-immigration-detention-the-aclu-just-sued-for-her-release/2017/10/31/8453eb50-be53-11e7-959c-fe2b598d8c00_story.html?utm_term=.eb54fd3ca057

[2] https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/10/08/trump-administration-immigration-policy-priorities; https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/10/08/president-donald-j-trumps-letter-house-and-senate-leaders-immigration;

[3] https://www.dhs.gov/executive-orders-protecting-homeland; http://cmsny.org/trumps-executive-orders-immigration-refugees/;

[4] https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/08/us/politics/white-house-daca.html

[5] http://www.bordermigrant.org/border-migrant-english.html

[6] See generally: https://cis.org/Operation-Blockade-Bullying-Tactic-or-Border-Control-Model; https://oig.justice.gov/special/9807/gkp01.htm

[7] Huysmans 2000, see: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/4763886_The_European_Union_and_the_Securitization_of_Migration

[8] See e.g: https://las.arizona.edu/sites/las.arizona.edu/files/The_Geography_of_Border_Militarization_V%20%282%29.pdf;

http://www.nnirr.org/drupal/border-militarization; https://cwsglobal.org/order-communities-and-faith-leaders-denounce-president-trumps-announcement-on-increased-border-militarization/; https://www.opendemocracy.net/can-europe-make-it/nick-buxton-mark-akkerman/deadly-consequences-of-europe-s-border-militarization

[9] https://www.americanimmigrationcouncil.org/research/criminalization-immigration-united-states; https://www.ceps.eu/system/files/Criminalisation%20of%20Irregular%20Migration.pdf; https://www.aclu.org/blog/immigrants-rights/criminalizing-immigrants-unlawful-and-harmful-public

[10] Weber and Pickering 2011, see: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282302882_Globalization_and_Borders_Death_at_the_Global_Frontier; https://www.opendemocracy.net/5050/leanne-weber/death-at-global-frontier; http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/thebordercrossingobservatory/research-agenda/external-border-control/deaths-at-the-global-frontier/; http://www.colibricenter.org/; https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/05/04/us/texas-border-migrants-dead-bodies.html; http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=57310#.WfzlntCnHIU

[11] hrw.org/news/2016/12/06/impact-externalization-migration-controls-rights-asylum-seekers-and-other-migrants; https://idcoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/INCIDENCIA_OK_ENGLISH.pdf; https://openmigration.org/en/analyses/the-externalisation-of-european-borders-steps-and-consequences-of-a-dangerous-process/; https://www.law.georgetown.edu/academics/centers-institutes/human-rights-institute/our-work/projects/upload/WRC-HRI-Border-Externalization_Oct-2015.pdf; https://academic.oup.com/ijrl/article-abstract/27/4/536/1567138?redirectedFrom=fulltext

[12] http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/103530461002000207; http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-9663.00048/full

[13] See Laudato Si, 16 http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si.html

[14] http://refugeesmigrants.un.org/migration-compact; http://refugeesmigrants.un.org/declaration

[15] https://www.icmc.net/sites/default/files/documents/ten-acts-full-document-oct-2017.pdf; http://refugees-migrants-civilsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/2016.10.25_HLD_Act-Now-ENGLISH-final.pdf

 

Impacto de las políticas
mígratorias de la Casa Blanca

11-27-2017

FRONTERA FACTS: El impacto local y las implicaciones generales de los principios y políticas sobre temas migratorios emitidos por la Casa Blanca

 

“Las tradiciones de los oprimidos nos enseñan que el estado de emergencia en que vivimos no es la excepción, sino la regla”

Walter Benjamin (1940)

 

Rosa Maria Hernandez (ver foto[1]) es la niña indocumentada de origen mexicano, de 10 años, y con parálisis cerebral, que fue primero interceptada por agentes de la Patrulla Fronteriza en camino a una cirugía urgente en su vesícula, y luego puesta bajo vigilancia durante su recuperación en el hospital, y detenida por 10 dias en un albergue en San Antonio. Esto resultó en la privación injusta de su libertad y la separación forzosa de su familia. Aunque haya sido por fin liberada, siguen viviendo ella y su familia en una gran incertidumbre que podría culminar en cualquier momento en su deportación y/o separación.

 

¿Qué nos dice el caso de Rosa Maria en cuanto a las implicaciones concretas de la postura de la administración de Trump en el ámbito de las políticas migratorias? Es su caso simplemente una aberración local, o será más bien representativo de tendencias más generalizadas? ¿Será posible que casos como el de Rosa Maria nos indican más en cuanto a la realidad actual y dirección futura de la administración de Trump, que sus pronunciamientos y decretos formales?

 

Hace mas de una mes que la administración de Trump emitió un documento resumiendo los principios y políticas que fundamentan su postura en cuanto a temas migratorios (Immigration Principles and Policies[2] acompañados por una carta dirigida a líderes del congreso que subraya sus prioridades en cuanto a cualquier intento de reforma migratoria. Estos textos a su vez elaboran en mayor detalle los elementos generales trazados por los decretos presidenciales (Executive Orders) [3] enfocados en asuntos de política migratoria (incluyendo las versiones multiples de una prohibición del ingreso a Estados Unidos a viajeros de paises de mayoría musulmana- “travel bans”- y de “escrutinio minucioso” -“extreme vetting”- de solicitantes de visa, ademas de otras que proponen intensificar medidas internas de control migratorio en general, y el castigo de politicas de “santuario” adoptadas por autoridades locales, que en efecto constituyen los prerequisitos impuestos por la administración Trump a cualquier paquete legislativo que incluya la extensión de protecciones para los beneficiarios de DACA (Dreamers o soñadores) [4].

 

Tambien se ha cumplido un año desde las elecciones presidenciales de 2016, que estuvieron permeadas por retórica xenófoba en cuanto a la supuesta necesidad de intensificar la seguridad fronteriza, y específicamente de un muro fronterizo. ¿Cuales son las implicaciones de los principios, las políticas, y las prioridades enunciadas por la adnministración en cuanto a los temas migratorios? ¿Hasta que punto se reflejan estas perspectivas en los principios, políticas, y prioridades federales en cuanto a temas migratorios, y dentro del marco de la intensificación de los esfuerzos nacionales y locales para hacer cumplir estos marcos represivos?

 

Nuestra intención en esta edición de Frontera Facts es proveer una introducción inicial a estos temas desde la perspectiva de su impacto en las familias y las comunidades que viven y trabajan en la región fronteriza entre México y Estados Unidos, que es la zona más directamente impactada por las politicas migratorias estadounidenses. Seguiremos explorando dimensiones específicas de las medidas propuestas en los documentos emitidos por la Casa Blanca, en mayor detalle en futuras ediciones de Frontera Facts.

 

Nuestra región tiene características únicas que la hacen especialmente vulnerable a la retórica prevaleciente, y a sus políticas y prácticas resultantes. Pero a la misma vez es importante subrayar que nuestras experiencias, sufrimiento, reflexión y resistencia han históricamente y proféticamente prefigurado tendencias nacionales, regionales y mundiales en cuanto a las políticas migratorias y los derechos de las y los migrantes de manera generalizada.  La Carta Pastoral emitida recientemente por el Obispo Seitz de la Diocésis de El Paso señala la combinación compleja de cargas, responsabilidades, y oportunidades que nuestra region vive y refleja en este contexto.[5] Ha sido mientras tanto frecuentemente tentador para legisladores y cabilderos enfocados en los cálculos políticos típicos de Washington DC aceptar medidas intensificadas de seguridad fronteriza a cambio de supuestos avances más generales en cuanto a reformas migratorias.

 

En muchos sentidos las iniciativas actuales de la administración Trump no implican nada realmente nuevo desde la perspectiva de nuestras experiencias en esta región. Desde los inicios de la década de los 1990’s la intensificación de las medidas de control migratorio han servido como pruebas de laboratorio para, y han prefigurado, iniciativas nacionales del mismo tipo.  Nuestro “estado permanente de emergencia”, caracterizado por violaciones generalizadas de los derechos humanos, fue en efecto extendido al resto del país después del 11 de septiembre. Desde esta perspectiva, nuestras condiciones concretas aqíi son a la misma vez extremas en términos de nuestras especificidades locales y desafíos, y representativos de lo que se ido imponiendo a escala más general en el resto del país. El caso trágico de Rosa Maria Hernández’ y su sufrimiento innecesario y el de su familia son tristemente ilustrativos de estas complejidades.

 

Las iniciativas federales más recientes le hacen eco a patrones y prácticas típicas de las políticas migratorias nacionales desde los noventas, que priorizan la llamada “seguridad fronteriza” como ejes centrales de sus intenciones, y específicamente enfatizan la importancia del muro fronterizo en nuestra región, y la extension de medidas afines a la frontera norte con Canadá.  Tambien incluyen una serie de acciones regresivas que intensifican el tipo de violaciones de los derechos humanos que son características de nuestra región, y que han sido subrayados en la Carta Pastoral del Obispo Seitz, en nuestro informe Discretion to Deny y su actualización inminente, y en ediciones previas de Frontera Facts.

 

Esto incluye medidas propuestas para aumentar y acelerar la deportación de, y disuadir los flujos de menores no acompañados, los solicitantes de asilo, y el retorno de migrantes desde la frontera y desde terceros paises, como “paises socios” en Centro y Sur America, de expandir los criterios que hacen inadmisibles a los solicitantes de visas, y para desalentar los intentos de re-ingresar ilegalmente al territorio estadounidense. Tambien incluyen medidas intensificadas de control migratorio interno (mas allá de las fronteras), y en cuanto a las ciudades y jurisdicciones santuario, mayor control del cumplimiento con la temporalidad de visas, aumentos de presupuesto para permitir la contratación de 10,000 agentes adicionales de ICE y de 300 fiscales migratorios, y tambien la expansión de la autoridad de ICE para detener infractores, y del programa de verificación aplicado por empleadores (“E-Verify”) y otras medidas para “proteger” trabajadores estadounidenses, expansión de la categoría de extranjeros deportables incluyendo criminales y miembros de pandillas, y más recientemente, después del ataque terrorista reciente en Nueva York, la eliminación del programa de lotería para la diversificación de las visas, y en terminos más fundamentales un cambio de paradigma de un sistema migratorio basado en la reunificación y protección de la integridad de las familias, a uno supuestamente basado en el “mérito”  (principal económico)individual.

 

Desde esta perspectiva, la intensificación de lo que se suele describir como la “seguridad fronteriza”, y todos los costos humanos que esto implica para nuestros vecinos, familias y comunidades, ha sido un pretexto y un chivo expiatorio utilizado para fundamentar iniciativas nacionales de control migratorio. El enfoque de la administración Trump en cuanto a tales principios, políticas y prioridades tiene que entenderse dentro de un marco regional y mundial más amplio. El énfasis represivo en las politicas migratorias estadounidenses desde la implementación en el sector de El Paso de lo que se describio inicialmente como la “Operacion Bloqueo” (“Operation Blockade”, y posteriormente como “Operation Hold the Line” o “Operacion Mantener la Linea”) en septiembre de 1993, y de “Operation Gatekeeper” (“Operacion Guardian) en San Diego en septiembre de 1994 [6], y la aprobación por el congreso federal del Illegal Immigration Reform and Responsibility Act (IIRA) en 1996, se profundizó aún más con la imposición del paradigma de “homeland security” (“seguridad de la patria”) como una de las secuelas claves del 11 de septiembre.

 

Todo esto se ha reforzado aún mas con el marco señalado por la administración Trump en sus decretos presidenciales (Executive Orders) y en los principios recientemente difundidos por la Casa Blanca. Esta dirección general ha sido descrita por estudiosos en términos de la “securitización”[7] de las politicas migratorias (su subordinacion a los supuestos imperativos de la “seguridad nacional”), la militarización de las fronteras [8], y la criminalización de los flujos indocumentados o “irregulares” en general [9], que necesariamente resultan en una mortandad mayor entre los migrantes en tránsito, y su vulnerabilidad intensificada al tráfico humano [10]. Estas tendencias a su vez están entrelazadas con procesos y mecanismos de control migratorio extraterritorial y transfronterizo como la “externalización” y regionalización de las fronteras y de los controles fronterizos (por ejemplo el traslado a estados vecinos- o “socios”- de la carga de medidas disuasivas y represivas de estos flujos, y su extensión a regiones enteras en la periferia de los Estados Unidos, la Unión Europea, y Australia)[11], y con la mercantilización de las y los migrantes (la tendencia a reducirlos a su supuesto valor económico o productivo,, sea en el mercado laboral o por sus gobiernos como contribuidores a la economia nacional a través de las remesas). Este tipo de instrumentalización de la persona humana ha sido denunciado por el Papa Francisco como una dimensión clave de la “economía del descarte” que trata a los seres humanos como si fueran “desechables”[13].

 

A la misma vez que la administración de Trump intenta profundizar aun más la precariedad persistente de los derechos de los y las migrantes en todo el pais y en la región fronteriza, los movimientos de migrantes, los defensores de sus derechos, y sus aliados se están posicionando para incidir en el proceso dentro del marco de la ONU, que culminará en la aprobación de Pactos Mundiales sobre la migración “segura, ordenada y regular” y en cuanto a temas de refugio en una cumbre mundial que se realizara en Nueva York en septiembre o octubre de 2018. Estos Pactos tomarán como base el texto de la “Declaración de Nueva York” sobre los derechos de migrantes y refugiado/as que se aprobó como resultado del “Diálogo de Alto Nivel” realizado en la  Asamblea General de la ONU en septiembre de 2016 [14]. Docenas de organizaciones de la sociedad civil de todo el mundo, incluyendo el Comité Católico Internacional de Migración, han conformado una red de convergencia que intenta incidir en las consultas y deliberaciones durante el proceso de redacción de los Pactos Mundiales para que asuma una postura más contundente a favor de una perspectiva centrada en los derechos humanos..[15]. Esta plataforma en efecto plantea una alternativa mundial a favor de la justicia migrante que contrasta fuertemente con la perspectiva en que están anclados los principios, políticas y prioridades promovidos por la Casa Blanca.

 

El Hope Border Institute/Instituto Fronterizo Esperanza, conjuntamente con otros colegas y redes, estará convocando un congreso fronterizo en Mayo de 2018 como parte de esfuerzos más amplios para posicionar los temas fronterizos y otros temas marginados, dentro del marco del proceso de elaboración de los Pactos Mundiales, y como parte del proceso que culminará tanto en la cumbre en la ONU cómo en el VII Foro Social Mundial sobre las Migraciones (FSMM) que se realizará en la Ciudad de Mexico del 2 al 4 de noviembre de 2018. Exploraremos estos temas en mayor detalle en ediciones proximas de Frontera Facts.

[1] https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/27/us/immigrant-girl-surgery-detained.html?_r=0; https://www.aclu.org/issues/release-rosa-maria-hernandez; ; https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/immigration/a-girl-with-cerebral-palsy-is-being-held-in-immigration-detention-the-aclu-just-sued-for-her-release/2017/10/31/8453eb50-be53-11e7-959c-fe2b598d8c00_story.html?utm_term=.eb54fd3ca057

[2] https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/10/08/trump-administration-immigration-policy-priorities; https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/10/08/president-donald-j-trumps-letter-house-and-senate-leaders-immigration;

[3] https://www.dhs.gov/executive-orders-protecting-homeland; http://cmsny.org/trumps-executive-orders-immigration-refugees/;

[4] https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/08/us/politics/white-house-daca.html

[5] http://www.bordermigrant.org/border-migrant-english.html

[6] See generally: https://cis.org/Operation-Blockade-Bullying-Tactic-or-Border-Control-Model; https://oig.justice.gov/special/9807/gkp01.htm

[7] Huysmans 2000, see: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/4763886_The_European_Union_and_the_Securitization_of_Migration

[8] See e.g: https://las.arizona.edu/sites/las.arizona.edu/files/The_Geography_of_Border_Militarization_V%20%282%29.pdf;

http://www.nnirr.org/drupal/border-militarization; https://cwsglobal.org/order-communities-and-faith-leaders-denounce-president-trumps-announcement-on-increased-border-militarization/; https://www.opendemocracy.net/can-europe-make-it/nick-buxton-mark-akkerman/deadly-consequences-of-europe-s-border-militarization

[9] https://www.americanimmigrationcouncil.org/research/criminalization-immigration-united-states; https://www.ceps.eu/system/files/Criminalisation%20of%20Irregular%20Migration.pdf; https://www.aclu.org/blog/immigrants-rights/criminalizing-immigrants-unlawful-and-harmful-public

[10] Weber and Pickering 2011, see: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282302882_Globalization_and_Borders_Death_at_the_Global_Frontier; https://www.opendemocracy.net/5050/leanne-weber/death-at-global-frontier; http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/thebordercrossingobservatory/research-agenda/external-border-control/deaths-at-the-global-frontier/; http://www.colibricenter.org/; https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/05/04/us/texas-border-migrants-dead-bodies.html; http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=57310#.WfzlntCnHIU

[11] hrw.org/news/2016/12/06/impact-externalization-migration-controls-rights-asylum-seekers-and-other-migrants; https://idcoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/INCIDENCIA_OK_ENGLISH.pdf; https://openmigration.org/en/analyses/the-externalisation-of-european-borders-steps-and-consequences-of-a-dangerous-process/; https://www.law.georgetown.edu/academics/centers-institutes/human-rights-institute/our-work/projects/upload/WRC-HRI-Border-Externalization_Oct-2015.pdf; https://academic.oup.com/ijrl/article-abstract/27/4/536/1567138?redirectedFrom=fulltext

[12] http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/103530461002000207; http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-9663.00048/full

[13] See Laudato Si, 16 http://w2.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/encyclicals/documents/papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si.html

[14] http://refugeesmigrants.un.org/migration-compact; http://refugeesmigrants.un.org/declaration

[15] https://www.icmc.net/sites/default/files/documents/ten-acts-full-document-oct-2017.pdf; http://refugees-migrants-civilsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/2016.10.25_HLD_Act-Now-ENGLISH-final.pdf

499 St. Matthews St.

El Paso, TX 79907

info@hopeborder.org

(915) 872-8400 ext.200

© 2019 by Hope Border Institute.​

  • Facebook - White Circle
  • Twitter - White Circle
  • YouTube - White Circle
  • LinkedIn - White Circle
  • Instagram - White Circle
Send us a message.